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Pillow Talk


I couldn’t say I expected a certain ‘type’ of client when I first started sex work, but we are all aware of the stereotypes associated with those who visit sex workers. Old, unattractive and completely unable to have sexual experiences independently - I can assure you this could not be further from the truth. I see a vast range of individuals partly due to the fact that I offer so many different services, but regardless of this, clients can never be boiled down to just a few characteristics. One thing that many of my clients do have in common however, is that they can often feel quite lonely and isolated. This isn’t the case for all of my clients of course, but I do think that it is actually the case for many men, which is currently my main client base. I often find myself thinking about male loneliness these days and have come to realise many things about men and their socialisation, which I may discuss another time. One client in particular comes to mind when I think of male loneliness - I find his situation and sexual psyche absolutely fascinating to be completely honest. It isn’t often that I get to know someone like I have with this client, but sometimes, after the main event has happened, if you want to put it that way, me and my clients will talk. They tell me all about their lives - their job; their friends; where they grew up; what interests them. I have had many jobs, with sex work being one I have enjoyed the most and intend to continue for the foreseeable future. I always knew I wanted to do something that involved people generally. In fact, my first career choice was being some sort of counsellor or therapist, and whilst it’s important that I emphasise I have no formal training or qualifications in this field, it’s something that my clients sometimes see as a part of our session. Often when my clients talk to me I get the feeling that they are spilling out with all of the thoughts and feelings they have been holding in, perhaps because they don’t have too many people in their lives to share them with. I think this is a feeling we can all relate to in some way. I certainly feeling this after even short periods of isolation, such as when I recently had covid. I almost talked my new housemate’s ear off after not seeing or speaking to anyone in person for a few days. Some people exist like that, going from their job or day to day life without seeing or speaking to anyone on a one-to-one level. More importantly, they may not be having quality conversations with people. I see the conversations I have with my clients often being just as important as the content of the sessions themselves - reconnecting on a face-to-face basis after a pandemic can be very daunting for some. I hope that during my sessions I can make this potential readjustment as smooth as possible for you. I believe it takes a lot of trust to fully let yourself ‘go’ in a session with a stranger, some will understandably feel apprehensive about coming to visit me, or even contacting me in the first place. Some keep an eye on my socials and my website for months before tentatively reaching out in the hopes that I will see them. I remember one young man who visited me recently was visibly trembling when he arrived in my hotel room, I took a bit longer with him at the start, reassuring him that he was safe and that we were going to have a fun hour - which we did. I realise that this comfortability may take time for some people, others may engage with me as if we have known each other for years. My point is that I will do my absolute best to make you feel comfortable, I am always genuine with my clients and expect the same in return. A space shared with me is safe and comforting - and this will always be the core focus of my sessions, as well as mutually assured filth, naturally. Miss Brynn x

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